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Talking Point: The Disney Institute Blog

Four Ways to Make a Brand Promise More Meaningful to Employees

April 28, 2015 by Bruce Jones, Senior Programming Director, Disney Institute

“You can design and create and build the most wonderful place in the world. But it takes people to make the dream a reality.” –Walt Disney

In a recent Talking Point post, we shared four things a brand promise needs in order to drive true customer loyalty. Together, these make up the building blocks of an effective brand promise—one that has the potential to connect emotionally with customers and is the basis on which lasting relationships can be formed. 

But, as we all know, making a promise is just the first step. To successfully drive true customer loyalty, you must also be able to consistently deliver on the brand promise over and over again—something that will require everyone in the organization to become brand managers and brand ambassadors who understand why, and know how, to apply the brand promise to their daily decisions and actions.

In fact, at Disney Institute, we believe and teach other business professionals that the brand promise belongs to everyone in the organization, and it must be central in all business decision-making.

However, through our work with other organizations, we often see this common mistake: companies sometimes struggle to deliver on their brand promise because they tend to focus resources disproportionately on the external communication of the promise (i.e., promoting to their customers) rather than devoting necessary resources to the internal communication to, and equipping of, the people (their employees) who are critical to delivering the brand experience.

An authentic brand promise is much more than a simple poster on a wall (which no one probably reads anyway). For it to be delivered consistently, time after time, across all touchpoints, a brand promise must be made meaningful for all employees.

To do this, review your brand promise and ensure that it is:

  • Simple – Easy for everyone to understand and state in his or her own words.
  • Realistic – Something that all employees believe they can deliver consistently.
  • Actionable – Something that can be translated into clear and concrete actions.
  • Indicative – It clearly demonstrates: “What you will do, and what you will not do.”

Reflecting back on Walt’s words, your customer experience is dependent on the people delivering it. These four tips can help ensure that everyone in the organization is prepared to deliver on your brand promise. 

How can you make your organization’s brand promise more meaningful for your employees?

We’d love to hear from you! 
Post your response below, or respond to us on Facebook or Twitter using Hashtag #DThinkBlog.


Disney Institute is ready to help you apply strategic rigor to your customer experience efforts - call us at 321.939.4600 or complete our Contact Form




Posted in Business Excellence | Tagged Brand Loyalty, Customer Loyalty, Loyalty, Brand Promise, Employee Training, Employee Communication, Internal Communication, Customer Experience, Bruce Jones


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